Christina Noble Children’s Foundation

Christina Noble Children’s Foundation

The Christina Noble Foundation foundation also known as CNCF is a non government organization, which dedicates to serving the worlds oppressed and marginalized children.

Formed in 1989 Christina who from a dream she had, during the time of the Vietnam war of Vietnamese street children begging for help, decided to visit Vietnam and in 1991 founded the foundation in Ho Chi Minh City and then later in 1997 extended the foundation to Mongolia.

Christina’s Background

Her own unforgiving past led her in this way. Born 23rd December 1944 Christina’s mother died when Christina was 10. Then she was placed in a orphanage and dishonestly told of the death of her siblings. She managed to escape and started to live rough in Dublin were she was unfortunately raped. If this wasn’t enough she then had her baby son adopted, against her will. 

If things couldn’t get any more crazy after some time she discovered the state had lied about the death of her siblings to her. Christina after searching found her brother in England moved there to live with him after she turned 18.

This great women, Christina and her thoughtful foundation have to this day established over 160 projects providing education, healthcare and community development humanitarian services to vulnerable children and their families and poor rural communities.

Christina’s achievements

The work of Christina hasn’t gone unnoticed with the release of the film Noble, a story of Christina’s life. And is also the author of 2 autobiographies Bridge Across My Sorrows’ (1994) and Mama Tina (1997).

The charity has helped over 1 million children and adults to date.

A short trailer of the movie Noble can be seen below.

The Orphanage

While on our trip to Vietnam I came across a foundation set up by this Irish lady, to help children that were destined to live on the streets.

As this foundation wasn’t just a walk in I contacted the foundation prior and was granted access for the afternoon.

The organisation now consists of an educational element for school aged children and an incredible rehabilitation sector for children physically maimed by the chemical aftermath of the Vietnam war. The school element teaches common educational capabilities that the students may need in their everyday lives as well as life skills to help them once they are beyond school age.

The other area of the foundation works with babies and children suffering physical growth delays or other deformities. The incredible program run here is done in conjunction with training Irish physiotherapists which means these children have access to treatments that they could never have dreamt of before.

Summary

My visit to this orphanage was certainly a difficult one due to the confronting realities of what these little people have been dealt. Having said that, it was also one of my most cherished memories from the entire trip as I had the opportunity to interact with the children and spend the afternoon watching the amazing volunteers go about their daily activities.

After being granted access i was anxious not knowing what i would be walking into or what may lie ahead. However at the same time excited to lend a hand or just to put a smile on someone’s face.

Please follow the link to the Christina Noble Children’s Foundation to find out more CNCF.

We learnt a lot from our time in Vietnam and what it was like during the bad times. A visit to the War Remnants Museum was also very educational and a huge eye opener what the country had to endure.

Thanks for stopping by check out what else we got up to in Vietnam with our Vietnam Food Journey, find out what to do in the city and Vietnam Day Trips From Ho Chi Minh posts.

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Nikko Hotel Ho Chi Minh

Nikko Hotel Ho Chi Minh

We stayed in the incredible Nikko Hotel Ho Chi Minh City and would stay there again without a doubt. With reasonable pricing, we were blown away by the amazing service, high-class facilities and cleanliness of the hotel.

Comfort and a high level of cleanliness is so important when visiting a city like Ho Chi Minh City as having somewhere amazing to retreat to after a day exploring a culture so different to your own, makes the world of different to the whole trip.

Rooms @ The Nikko Hotel

The standard rooms were huge in our opinion. They had a shower room, separate toilet and stand-alone bath, perfect for a long soak after a day exploring in the hot, humid weather.

Each night on our return to the room, we had handmade chocolates waiting for us on our pillows (I’m not going to lie…there may have been a race back to the room each night to have first pick!)

View from our room

The Location Of Nikko Hotel

The location of the hotel was perfect for getting around and all major points of interest in the city were easily accessible from here.

It was about 2 kilometres to the major markets in the city centre (Bến Thành Market),and 3 kilometres to some of the major historic tourist attractions such as the Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica.

We walked to both areas of the city from the hotel on numerous occasions but if walking isn’t your thing, there is a complimentary shuttle bus from the hotel to the city that leaves frequently throughout the day.

Facilities @ The Nikko

The Hotel also had a well-equipped gym and beautiful rooftop swimming pool.

There were complimentary towels available in each and were never too busy which was ideal for a relaxing start to the morning or chill out in the afternoon.

The Bar @ The Nikko

The Hotel bar was the perfect place to finish off a busy day and I will admit, we had one or two night caps there during our stay. Our cocktail of choice was the Saigon Rock, a ginger twist to the perfect mojito, and the perfect partner to the candied nuts that accompanied our drinks. A pianist on a grand piano and a honey-voiced singer set the ambience in the bar, adding the class you would expect from the incredible hotel.

The Food @ The Nikko

We didn’t actually eat in the restaurant because we were so busy out but the breakfast there was something else. The choices on offer were the usual , egg station, hot food items, pastries, fruit, cured meats, cheeses, fresh cereals and granalos, fresh juices but on top of that a wonderful Japanese section, which were served in little almost like tapas plate style and every day a different Vietnamese soup.

Vietnamese soup @ the nikko

They say breakfast is the most important meal of the day. So definitely worth fueling up here.

Check out the Nikko for deals and see what’s available

Longing for some more of Ho Chi Minh, we have visited the Mekong Delta and many restaurants in HoChi Minh aslo.

War Remnants Museum Ho Chi Minh City

History Of The Naming

A museum run and operated by the Ho Chi Minh City government. The largest war museum Vietnam has to offer.

The museum has undertaken 3 name changes. Firstly known as Exhibition House for US and Puppet Crimes and was opened in 1975.

Secondly in 1990 the name was changed, dropping the words US and Puppet and replaced to Exhibition House for Crimes of War and Aggression.

And finally in 1995 and still to this day, is known as the War Remnants Museum. Due to a turn to normal diplomatic relations with the US and the end of the embargo a year earlier.

The War Remnants Museum

This War Remnants Museum certainly isn’t for the faint hearted but the depictions of the brutal occurrences during the infamous Vietnam war, are undeniable.

It was a huge eye-opener for us in regards to the harsh realities of what really went on during the war. Greeted at the entry gates by US armoured vehicles, bombs and infantry weapons, the scene was set for the uncut truths that lay ahead.

In the court yard area, rooms or cells display the inhumane means adopted to hold prisoners (‘tiger cages’), and some of the French mechanisms used at the time such as the guillotine. These scenes leave very little to the imagination and make the harsh realities very feasible in one’s mind.

Inside the Museum

As you move through the museum itself, it is laid out in very distinct sections. Some are artefact based while others are heart-breaking exhibitions of photographs taken during the harrowing days of the war from the ground.

What stuck with me most from our visit, was the images of the innocent children maimed by the dropping of Agent Orange onto Vietnamese soil. It would be advised to stay a few steps ahead of children during this tour due to the explicit nature of the material and perhaps be ready to skip past certain elements if necessary.

Summary Of The War Remnants Museum

In conclusion The trip was a very interesting morning, although tragic it was a great insight as to what happened and we found it extremely interesting as it would of been something I wasn’t truly knowledgeable about.

Museum Details

Opening Times 7:30 – 18:00 Mon – Sun

Cost: Around 15 euros

Tel: (84-4) 39302112

Email: warrmhcm@gmail.com

Website: War Remnants Museum

Thanks for stopping by don’t forget to check out our over Vietnam posts. Like our stay in the luxurious Nikko Hotel, find the Best Tings To Do in Ho Chi Minh and work up a hunger and join our Ho Chi Minh Food Journey

Banh Xeo ( Vietnamese Rice Cake) Recipe

Bánh Xèo

We have decided to start posting a few recipes from local dishes around the world I have picked up over my travels. Being a chef myself I love picking up new and fresh ideas and first up we will go with the Vietnamese pancake bánh xèo recipe.

Food from Vietnam is divine here is one of my favourite Vietnamese dishes to try. Bánh xèo or crispy Vietnamese pancakes dish does not disappoint and your be wanting more and a bit more. The use of fresh herbs and bean sprouts in the dish really give it a great texture and flavour.

Meaning

Bánh xèo  is a crispy, stuffed rice pancake popular in Vietnam. Bánh mean cake while xèo means sizzle. The name refers to the loud sound the rice batter makes when it is poured into the hot skillet. It is a savoury fried pancake made of rice flour, water, and turmeric powder.

Where To Eat

I remember my first experience of bánh xèo, in the Ben Tahn Markets in Ho Chi Minh City. Such great texture, flavour and freshness. Other popular spots to find these where on the street food scene of Ho Chi Minh City, a very popular street food item for the city.

We also tried them at a favourite Vietnamese spot of ours on the Gold Coast a restaurant called Can Tho Kitchen. It was just like being transported back to Vietnam itself

Ingredients For Bánh Xèo

Serves: 4 

Crepe

  • 160g rice flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric powder
  • 240ml coconut milk
  • 120ml water

Filling

  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil,
  • 1 diced onion
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced, or more to taste
  • 350g fresh prawns, peeled and deveined
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce, or more to taste
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • Picked coriander bunch
  • 50g diced spring onion
  • 450g bean sprouts
  • 1 bunch thai basil
  • 1/2 bunch mint
  • 4 lettuce leaves, or as needed

Method

  1. Mix rice flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt and turmeric together in a large bowl. Beat in coconut milk to make a thick batter. Slowly beat in water until batter is the consistency of a thin crepe batter.
  2. Heat 1 1/2 tablespoon oil in a large pan over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic; cook and stir until soften but not browning, 1 to 2 minutes. Add prawns; saute until cooked through and opaque, 3 to 4 minutes. Season with fish sauce, lime juice and salt. Transfer filling to a bowl.
  3. Preheat oven to 110 C / Gas ¼.
  4. Wipe the pan and reheat over medium heat. Add remaining 1 1/2 teaspoon oil. Stir crepe batter and pour 1/2 mug into the hot pan, swirling to coat the bottom. Lay 3 or 4 of the cooked prawns on the bottom half of the crepe. Top with a small handful of beansprouts, coriander, thai basil, mint and spring onions. Cook until batter looks set and edges start to brown, about 1 minute. Fold crepe over and slide onto an oven-safe plate.
  5. Place crepe in the preheated oven to keep warm. Repeat with remaining batter and filling.
  6. Serve lettuce leaves alongside filled crepes. Break off pieces of crepe and roll up in lettuce leaves to eat.

Enjoy let us know how it goes

Thanks for stopping by, its a pleasure to share

We love Vietnamese food so much and it was also one of our favourite trips check out our Vietnam food story below

Our Vietnam Food journey Enjoy! Also recipes and dishes like this Vietnamese pancake go live on our Instagram page.

Things To Do In Ho Chi Minh

Things To Do In Ho Chi Minh City

These incredible day trips can be done from Ho Chi Minh city and we would highly recommend each one. Not only do you get a full immersion in the Mekong River itself (not literally!) and Cu Chi Tunnels, but the trips to these destinations and the stops along the way are just as interesting and culturally intriguing.

We had a couple of individual days away from the city for these excursion and they were such eye-openers and a very different perspective on this region of Vietnam.

For our tours we used Maika Tours they were very good informative and friendly.

Vinh Trang Temple

Our first major stop of the morning, was at an incredible temple. This temple was a working temple, and we were lucky enough to arrive when the resident monks were beginning a prayer session.

Adhering to cultural practices, such a covering our shoulders and removing shoes before entering the prayer area, we could observe the monks and their fascinating rituals during this session. This was something I had never witnessed in reality before and I really enjoyed the calm environment created within the scared space.

We were given plenty of time at this stop to explore the grounds of the temple and take pictures in the exquisite gardens dotted with incredible towering buddas.

Tip: As there weren’t many options to purchase food along the way, it would be advisable to take some little things with you to snack on throughout the day trips.

Mekong Delta

Our final destination or region, for the afternoon, was the Mekong River Delta. This part of the trip encompassed a few different elements, each with its own charm and unique purpose in the area.

The Mekong region itself is made up of a network of rivers and islands, all of which we got a good sample.

First, we were taken across the river on a boat while we sipped on our complimentary fresh coconuts! We were taken to a small island where we were greeted by some local bee keepers and got to sample some of the delicious by-products created from their honey.

After a little stop and the delicious refreshments, we carried on through some local village fruit stalls to what resembled a pub or bar. Here we were treated to a show of traditional folk music and were given fruit platters to snack on while we watched.

We met some of the local animals while in this village too!

Further along this track, we came to a coconut candy factory. We wandered through the factory while the workers skilfully focused on their particular element of the production line and we even got to sample the wares before we indulged at the gift shop.

This was another interesting element of the trip we hadn’t anticipated and enjoyed it for its authentic flare.

Mekong Boat Ride

After we meandered through this little village, we came to the edge of a river where we were taken upstream on traditional boats while sporting our grass hats.

This was an incredible part of the day and a river ride we will never forget. The casual greetings between the local Vietnamese ladies and the tall bamboo shoots lining the waterways as we floated along, highlighted the authentic scene we could only have imagined.

Our day came to an end with a delicious meal prepared, cooked and served to us at a restaurant we reached by horse drawn cart.

We had the most amazing spread of Vietnamese cuisine, from whole fresh fish to stir fry vegetable dishes and all the delicious sides and accompaniments we could have thought of.

Lacquer factory

Factory History

The next day trip we took, had a later start and our first stop was at a factory on the outskirts of the city.

On route to this destination, our tour guide, gave us a very detailed history of how this facility had come about and the importance of it for the well-being of so many Vietnamese located in Ho Chi Minh.

The factory had been a government initiated scheme to assist those effected by the chemical aftermath of the Vietnam war. Many people in this region of the country, are still being born physically or mentally maimed by the chemicals that were dropped on Ho Chi Minh so many years ago.

As a result of their disabilities and consequent difficulties in terms of employment, many are left homeless. The government created this facility and a huge number of job opportunities for these people who are at a disadvantage within society.

The Factory

On our arrival at the factory, we were given a tour and shown the incredible work undertaken inside.

The items being produced were varied in their purpose, from dishes and chopsticks to elaborate vases and wall mounted pictures. The intricate steps to produce each piece was explained to us as we meandered through the floor of the factory and watched the talented craftspeople at work.

They were using extraordinary materials in such a delicate way, such as cracked egg shells and mother of pearl, and techniques I had never seen before. At the end of our tour, we had the opportunity to browse the finished products in the factory’s gift shop and the chance to purpose anything if we wished.

We purchased a beautiful finger bowl embossed with coloured egg shell, something our friends always comment on when we take it out at dinner parties. Not only is it a unique and stunning piece, but the money made in the shop goes directly to the workers, making the purchase all the sweeter.

Cu Chi Tunnels

The next stop of the afternoon and was certainly one to remember and an iconic experience when in this part of the world. The Cu Chi Tunnels hold many heartbreaking realities of the inhumane lengths the Vietnamese people had to go to during the war just to survive.

The tunnels themselves are frightening in terms of the space available to the people manoeuvring through this network. We had the opportunity to experience the actual size of the tunnels during the war but due to the minute dimensions, these particular tunnels were only for standing and photographic purposes.

There are other tunnels (that in my opinion are still tiny!), but have been expanded for the purpose of tourism and to allow people move through them to experience something similar to what may have been the reality all those years ago.

Tip: If you are at all claustrophobic, perhaps think this activity through carefully before entering the tunnels. Also, if you have a backpack with you, either leave it outside with a friend or take it off your back while crawling through the tunnel.

Interesting Cu Chi Tunnel Facts

Another interesting fact we learned at the Cu Chi Tunnels, was how this society survived underground for such a length of time.

Food would have been an obvious challenge during this time but to avoid detection by soldiers, the Vietnamese people in this region lived off tapioca or cassava root. They could cook this underground and had small chimney-like vents located far away from the tunnels entries to help avoid detection. Adding to the authenticity of our trip, we were served cassava chips as a snack before we departed this stop.

As well as the tunnels, we also got to see others elements of the war at this destination. From intricate traps to huge machinery used by the American soldiers, this was another side to the war we hadn’t experienced while visiting the memorial sites in the city.

And Finally

These were certainly day trips we will never forget and highly recommend to anyone visiting Ho Chi Minh city and looking for a great Vietnam day tip experience. There is so much more to experience in this region of Vietnam than just the city life and what a shame it would be to miss out on such a diverse experience when you are so close to it all.

I hope this post can be of some assistance to anyone planning a trip to this region and perhaps it may even entice some people to consider this little addition to their itinerary. We would certainly recommend the Mekong, we wish we had time to do the floating markets.

Where To Stay

The 5 star Nikko hotel in the centre of Ho Chi Minh City is a must stay. With its great bars, restaurants, entertainment, shops, leisure facilities and the highest quality rooms and comfort.

It very reasonable in price also check out our review on the Nikko

Thanks for stopping by and reading our tips on things to do in Ho Chi Minh. Check out some more of our Vietnam Section

Best Things To Do Around Ho Chi Minh

Best Things To Do Around Ho Chi Minh

Sightseeing in Ho Chi Minh is a must a city that is full of so many interesting things to see and do that we were hard-pushed to fit everything we wanted into a week

There truly is something for everyone in this diverse city.

Although we wouldn’t be huge history fans, we found the historical sites relating to the Vietnam war fascinating and they gave us a greater understand and appreciation of the culture itself.

Architecture

Throughout Ho Chi Minh city, evidence of European influence is rife. There are some incredible landmarks dotted around the city from the French colonial era, each one beautiful and individual by the native structures that surround them.

Notre Dame Cathedral

This cathedral is a beautiful piece of French architecture in the middle of Ho Chi Minh city. The medieval Catholic cathedral was constructed entirely from materials imported from France which explains the authentic feel you get when visiting the incredible structure.

On the day we went, there was a wedding photo shoot happening on the grounds, which was a magical scene to stumble upon.

Notre Dame Cathedral

Central Post Office

In the same vicinity as the cathedral, the Central Post Office stands proud.

This amazing structure was designed by the French architect Alfred Foulhoux and his French stamp can still be seen today.

The arched windows with wooden shutters are a reminder of the 19thcentury era in which this post office was erected.

Outside Central Post Office

The marble floors are breathtaking on entry and the antique telephone boxes are a reminder of how important this building would have been in its day, a time before the internet and mobile phones.

Inside Central Post Office

Not only is this building stunning in appearance and of huge historical importance, it is also a functioning post office today! It is the perfect place to send your postcards home.

Bến Thành Market

This market is a without a doubt a MUST when visiting Ho Chi Minh.

Within a warehouse style building in the centre of the city, lies this treasure chest of anything you want..

From clothes and rolls of silks, to chopsticks and raw meat, there isn’t an inch of this building not utilised for wares of some sort.

The market is divided up into different sections so you can easily avoid the raw food section if you have a weaker tummy, but if you can, this area is worth a visit to see how grocery shopping in done in a different culture!

Market Tips

Something you may also need when visiting these markets is a little extra patience than usual. The stall holders are keen to flog you their wares so as soon as you show a speck on interest in their goods, they will do all in their power to convince you to make a purchase. This is good if you are interested in making a purchase as it allows you to haggle with the tellers.

There are many stalls with similar products so each stall owner will be willing to give you a ‘discount’ if they can keep you at their shop. A little tip would be to half whatever their asking price is and go from there with your bargaining. If that doesn’t seem to be working, pretending to walk away often helps negotiations!

Tip: Our hotel had a free shuttle service that did regular drop-offs to the Bến Thành Markets every day. Worth looking into if staying at a hotel.

If walking to the markets from another location in the city, BE CAREFUL when crossing the intersection at the front…it is on another level of hectic!!

 Orphanage – Christina Noble Children’s Foundation

Something I often like to seek out when in a different country are local orphanages and one that stood out was the Christina Noble Foundation.

While in Vietnam, I came across a foundation set up by an Irish lady many years ago, to help children that were destined to live on the streets.

The organisation now consists of an educational element for school aged children and an incredible rehabilitation sector for children physically maimed by the chemical aftermath of the Vietnam war.

The school element teaches common educational capabilities that the students may need in their everyday lives as well as life skills to help them once they are beyond school age.

The other area of the foundation works with babies and children suffering physical growth delays or other deformities. The incredible program run here is done so in conjunction with training Irish physiotherapists which means these children have access to treatments that they could never have dreamt of before.

The Orphanage

My visit to this orphanage was certainly a difficult one due to the confronting realities of what these little people have been dealt. Having said that, it was also one of my most cherished memories from the entire trip as I had the opportunity to interact with the children and spend the afternoon watching the amazing volunteers go about their daily activities.

Historical Sites

War Remnants museum

This trip certainly isn’t for the faint hearted but the depictions of the brutal occurrences during the infamous Vietnam war, are undeniable. It was a huge eye-opener for us in regards to the harsh realities of what really went on during the war.

Greeted at the entry gates by US armoured vehicles, bombs and infantry weapons, the scene was set for the uncut truths that lay ahead.

In the court yard area, rooms or cells display the inhumane means adopted to hold prisoners (‘tiger cages’), and some of the French mechanisms used at the time such as the guillotine.

These scenes leave very little to the imagination and make the harsh realities very feasible in one’s mind.

As you move through the War Remnants Museum itself, it is laid out in very distinct sections.

Some are artefact based while others are heart-breaking exhibitions of photographs taken during the harrowing days of the war from the ground.

What stuck with me most from our visit, was the images of the innocent children maimed by the dropping of Agent Orange onto Vietnamese soil. It would be advised to stay a few steps ahead of children during this tour due to the explicit nature of the material and perhaps be ready to skip past certain elements if necessary.

Tip:We bought our tickets at the entry gates on the day we visited so no need to worry about trying to book ahead of time.

Independence Palace

To continue on the historic thread, a visit to this demanding structure is a must. Also known as the Reunification Palace, this building was home and office to past Vietnamese presidents.

This grand construction is a hot spot for tourists and the layout and maintenance of the internal buildings certainly hold up to expectation.

The back of the building was the private living quarters of the presidents, and these rooms can also be visited. The bomb shelter in the basement is possible the most exciting of all with its communications room and network of underground tunnels.

Tip: This was a very interesting place to visit and much larger than we had anticipated.

I feel I better stop there, as I could go on forever about all the amazing places we visited while in Ho Chi Minh sightseeing.

Thanks for stopping by as always, when coming to see this city there also plenty of great day trips to do outside the city like the famous Cu Chi Tunnels or take a ride down the Mekong Delta.

All this exploring may make you hungry so why not check out some of our food posts around Ho Chi Minh city itself, complete with our insiders tips.

Vietnam Adventure – here we come!

Vietnam Adventure

Our Vietnam adventure was centred in Ho Chi Minh city which is located in the southern region of the country. Still widely known by its original name, Saigon, both locally and internationally.

This amazing city is famous for its major role in the Vietnam War and its is heavily represented and very evident today. We spent over a week here and left no stone unturned including the incredible and eye opening War Remnants Museum.

On arrival in Ho Chi Minh city, it certainly was a culture shock, although we were prepared for it to be very different from the comfort we are accustomed to in Australia.

The city centre and surrounding towns are populated by about 12 million people. The pressure of these huge numbers is very evident on the infrastructure of the city.

The electric wires hanging loosely across major roads and the manic intersections, with ‘organised’ mayhem, certainly take getting used to! Bearing all this in mind and the debatable cleanliness of the city in general, it is advisable to choose your accommodation wisely.

Tip: Transport varies HUGELY in price, so don’t get caught out! If using a taxi, only use the Vinasun company as the alternate taxi service is SUPER expensive. Uber is available in Ho Chi Minh, so if you have an account, this is probably the most reasonable option.

Nikko Hotel

We stayed in the Hotel Nikko Saigon and would stay there again without a doubt.

Comfort and a high level of cleanliness is so important when visiting a city like Ho Chi Minh as having somewhere amazing to return to after a day exploring a culture so different to your own is comforting

The standard rooms were huge in our opinion. They had a shower room, separate toilet and stand-alone bath, perfect for a long soak after a day exploring in the hot, humid weather.

Each night on our return to the room, we had handmade chocolates waiting for us on our pillows.

Hotel Location

The location of the hotel was perfect for getting around and all major points and seeing the best things to do in the city. Around 2 kilometres to the major markets in the city (Bến Thành Market),and 3 kilometres to some of the major historic attractions such as the Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica.

We walked to both areas of the city from the hotel on many occasions but if walking isn’t your thing, there is a complimentary shuttle bus from the hotel to the city that leaves frequently throughout the day.

Hotel Facilities

The hotel also had a well-equipped gym and beautiful rooftop swimming pool. There were complimentary towels available in each and were never too busy which was ideal for a relaxing start to the morning or chill out in the afternoon.

The hotel bar was the perfect place to finish off a busy day and I will admit, we had one or two night caps there during our stay.

Our cocktail of choice was the Saigon Rock, a ginger twist to the perfect mojito, and the perfect partner to the candied nuts that accompanied our drinks.

A pianist on a grand piano and a singer set the ambience in the bar, adding the class you would expect from this hotel.

Ho Chi Minh Climate

Ho Chi Minh has two main seasons, the wet season and the dry season.

Generally, the wet season falls between May and October with the wettest month being July. The dry season usually begins in December and comes to an end in April. The average temperate throughout the year is approximately 28 degrees Celsius, with slight variations between the wet and dry seasons.

The rain that fell during our stay, fell at night and there was hardly any evidence of it the next morning.

The humidity may be something to consider though, if you are travelling from a cooler climate. Living in Australia, hot days and high levels of humidity are conditions we are somewhat familiar with.

And Finally Our Vietnam Adventure Has Begun

Wow, reminiscing on this trip makes me appreciate it all over again.

The astonishing features and breathtaking structures from different cultural influencers also communicate its tumultuous past. And even the interesting back streets and street culture of this city, is one of fascination in itself, making this an incredible trip from start to finish.

Thank you for taking the time to read our Vietnam adventure post.

We are so excited to be sharing this adventure with you and can’t wait to show you the amazing places we visited and the remarkable food we found experiences we had.

Don’t forget to interact and leave a comment or ask a question. Did you have a Vietnam adventure you want to tell us about.

Make sure you check out a few more of our Vietnam posts and see what else we got up to.

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